NC SHEROES 2017 AWARDEES

It’s Woman History Month! Let’s celebrate the amazing contributions women make to our world and our future.

We are so fortunate to have several remarkable women from our community who are going to share their journey as we as answer any question you may have for them.

Come join  Momsrising THIS Saturday March 18th 2017   Beatties Ford Rd. Regional Library at 1pm; as we highlight and celebrate our selected SHEROES!

The award ceremony and roundtable includes a “Dress Up-Fantasy”  area for the children and a light reception following.This event is free! So come on! Ready to attend? Well it’ll be here  in no time. For now get to know more about each of them here.

Meet Chautauqua Ellison, NC SHERO

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Chautauqua Ellison, NC SHERO

Born February 24, 1973, on a Saturday evening to Glenda Graves (American) and Herman Morris (Guyanese). A product of both the foster care system and adoption system. Adopted at the age of 15 after going from one abusive foster family to another and having experienced abuse with the family she hoped to have finally found love and her place of belonging only to feel the cycle of being not wanted, she came to understand what she wanted part of her journey to be. She understood she wanted to help little brown girls like herself.
A graduate of Marlboro County High School in 1992 and immediately went off to college. She attended Morris College in Sumter, SC, Commissioned as 2nd Lieutenant in the United States Army, April 1997 and graduated May 10th, 1997 with a Bachelor of Arts in English.
After graduating from college Chautauqua moves to Charlotte, NC and this is where she began her career in Early Education. Chautauqua has taught Early Education for 19 years. She is also a former HeadStart Educator.
Chautauqua became a member of the Order of Eastern Star, Queen Sheba #5 at the age of 21 and is still active with the Junior Eastern Stars affiliated with her chapter. At this time she began to have a full experience with SISTERHOOD.
Fast forward to the year 2010 and Chautauqua becomes involved with an amazing organization called I Am My Sister. She has facilitated evidence-based program pm Teen Pregnancy and Teen STDs/STI for 4 years for the organization. In 2013 Chautauqua started the first community-based club for the organization. In January of 2016, she became the Executive Director for I Am My Sister NC and SC chapter.
I Am My Sister is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that provides programs and resources centered around leadership development, healthy relationships, beauty and body image, career development, community service and support, entrepreneurship and workforce development, financial literacy, adolescent sexual health and teen parenting support, education and mentoring services for youth and their families.
I Am My Sister’s programs and services are available to youth and families in NC, SC, MD, NY, GA and CA.
I Am My Sister LOVES diversity! We’re PRO-YOUNG PEOPLE and don’t discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, ethnicity, religion, national origin, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, sex or disability.
Along with being an active member of the OES (Order of Eastern Star), Chautauqua is also an active member of the Black Women Caucus of Mecklenburg , a member of the School Leadership Team at Lincoln Heights School (CMS) and a member of The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).
Chautauqua was also a nominee for the 2017 Mayor’s Mentor Alliance Award.
Chautauqua also lives by her personal motto: In order to teach life lessons, one must have lived the lesson beginning taught.

Meet Amanda Zullo, Founder + Owner

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Amanda Zullo is the Founder and Owner of Pop Up Produce

Pop Up Produce

Amanda Zullo is the Founder and Owner of Pop Up Produce and a 2016 Emerging City Champions grant recipient winner, sponsored by 8 80 Cities and the Knight Foundation. A designer, community engager and food enthusiast, she has a passion for health and wellness, sustainable living and fresh food. Amanda earned her Masters in Urban Design with a Post-Masters Certificate in Real Estate Development, a Bachelors of Architecture, and a Bachelors of Arts in Architecture with a Minor in Geography, all from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. In both academic and professional realms, her focus has been to foster healthy communities through the built environment using design towards community activism. She has been involved in numerous local volunteer organizations, from educating the youth through various programs and work relating to community outreach.

 

Meet 2017 NC Shero: Nakisa Glover ng

She is a mom, native of Charlotte, NC and holds a biology degree from UNC-Charlotte.
She has built a track record as a community organizer, with years of experience in corporate, community and service-based work. She has a passion for advocacy and contributing positively to the community. She is the co-host of TheAgenda, a local think tank dedicated to creating space built on four pillars to Inform, Discuss, Network and take Action. As a strong collaborator, she brings her perspective to her current role with Hip Hop Caucus as National Climate Justice Organizer. She is the former national field coordinator for the Justice Action Mobilization Network (JAMN), a group dedicated to advancing climate change policy using a fusing social justice and climate justice. Her deep local and national networks mean that Ms. Glover has resources and contacts for dealing effectively with such critical issues as climate, social and economic justice. She was recently recognized as an Emerging Leader in the Climate Movement and is the recipient of the Clean Air Carolina the 2016 Airkeeper Award, joining NC Governor Roy Cooper, Dr. James Kenny, and other business leaders.

Meet NC Shero; Je’lah Singleton.

DJ

D-Jé Boogie can be contacted via the following channels: Email – http://www.djeboogie00.com Instagram – @djeboogie00 Twitter- @djeboogie00 Facebook- D-Je’ Boogie Telephone – 980.202.3036

Jèlah Singleton, aka D-Jé Boogie, is a teenage female DJ who has presently been developing her craft for a little over a year. The idea of aspiring to become a DJ occurred when she realized how she could share her creativity and her love for music with others. D-Jé believes music has no boundaries or barriers. The art of being a DJ bridges gaps of age, ethnicity and various backgrounds.

 

Music has always been a huge part of D-Jé Boogie’s life. Sharing her craft allows her to share her love for the innocence and different moods of music. The variety of DJ engagements allows her to choose and ‘’play with” the appropriate genre of music for any occasion.

Becoming a DJ has required the investment in equipment, time and learning the art of the craft. She enrolled in classes, which enhanced her love for mixing and transitioning music. While attending the WTHands DJ Academy, D-Jé Boogie was selected to appear on WBTV for one their young DJ spots. That exposure improved her confidence to perform in front of crowds. Entrepreneurship has proven to be challenging and has also required discipline. However, entrepreneurship has also allowed D-Jé Boogie, as a teenager, to be her own boss. The God-given gift of her love for music will continue to reach people of all ages and allow her to share  their special moments.

Although DJ Boogie has been trained to provide the appropriate music for many occasions, she has been labeled as having an Old Soul. Her personal music of choice is different genres of music from the 1960s -1990s

 

Meet NC Shero; Flo Ward, We Chic’d It

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Flo is a creative environmentalist and DIYer. She used her prior experiences to start  We Chic’d It!, a furniture upcycling company based in North Carolina with the mission to help keep usable solid wood antique and vintage furniture from going into our landfills.
After completing her undergraduate work in Fine Arts, she worked as a graphic designer for several publishing/marketing companies, such as AutoTrader and Pilot Media Companies, until switching careers and going back to school to become an educator/trainer of technology within the school system. Now, several years later, she uses her knowledge of color, DIYing (do it yourself crafts), and education to teach others how to refinish, refurbish, reupholster, and repurpose their home furniture and decor items. Becoming the Queen DIYer/Upcycling Creationist that everyone knows her to be. Always thinking outside of the box, and generating ideas on Facebook, Pinterest, and HomeTalk. She is a married, mother of three and lives in the Lake Norman area, near Charlotte, North Carolina.

 

Meet NC Shero; Judith Wilson, – Foodie4Access

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Judith Wilson Burkes http://www.foodie4access.org http://www.sssmovement.com Facebook: #judielise #foodie4access #sssmoves #celebratec Twitter: @judielise, @sss_movement, Foodie4Accessclt

 

Judith Wilson Burkes is a nonprofit founder, author/blogger, internet radio host, community disability advocate and business owner.

Growing up in New York City, she developed a passion for the arts and all creativity. After attending an art high school against the wishes of her family, Judith tried to work for corporate America. She worked for various industries, usually finding a way to bring her love of creativity to the job, for more than 15 years, before her health made her leave the workforce in her mid-30s. She faced hardship in her relationships as well, as two marriages ended in divorce, leaving her to raise two sons on the autism spectrum virtually by herself. Despite her own health issues, Judith continued to work at home, first with her own graphic design company, and then virtually for technology-driven companies.

Moving from NY to MD, and now making Charlotte, NC her home, Judith formed her own nonprofit, Foodie4Access in 2016, to break down barriers of isolation faced by people and families touched by disability. Then, after meeting the founder of a local singles organization, Judith quickly saw the value of his idea to do for Christian singles what she was driven to do for people with disabilities.

With her two sons grown and independent, Judith now spends her time creating inclusive events that focus on changing lifestyles and mindsets.

Today, as President of The Single, Saved and Serious Movement and founder of Foodie4AccssCLT, she hopes to foster a sense of community among people who want to expand their social and entertainment horizons, while making a difference in local underserved communities, with small businesses and outreach organizations poised to make a difference.

 

“Do Not wait for someone else to come and speak for you. It’s you who can change the world”. -M.Y.

This gathering is in part sponsored by Momsrising. To RSVP and find out more information, visit our Facebook event at: https://goo.gl/NXoUDw   or follow along on Twitter with NCSheroes2017

 

 

Friday Four: Lessons From a Student Athlete’s Mom

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I think everyone has a story, but If I may, let me tell you why I am sitting here smiling from ear to ear.  It’s a classic story. Teen girl from a small town get pregnant and quits school to raise her child and never leaves the small town.BUT this isn’t my story!

I had a son at 16 years old. I finished college. Got married. Now I work from home . Today, that child graduates from college  with a college degree in May!

Be Happy For Where You Are.

  Be the Best At What You Are.

But Never Stay Where You Are- KLP

I will never claim to know everything. But these are four tips I want to share with you to help get through those college years with your student athlete!

  1. Provide Birth Control– Since my son was not a virgin upon entering college, stopping at the big box store to purchase supplies including a large box of condoms was on list of “Must Do!” I didn’t want to play stupid. My son is a 6’8  basketball player. Grown women ,non African american women, and everything in between was hitting on him before he left for school and I knew that attending college and left to his own desires……. it would not end. So as always, it’s better safe than sorry parents.
  2. Stay Connected like AT&T– Now there’s FaceTime, Texting, Instagram, SnapChat,  and even cheap gas (yes, I said it) While there is nothing like a care package or phone call, don’t limit yourself to those two things. Be your child’s biggest fan! You should always be his/her biggest support system. College is stressful and can be over whelming.Continue to guide your child.                           Those pressley Boys 7-6-2015 12-21-33 PM
  3. Be supportive like banker– Give them money but be very discriminate. If you were giving them allowance when they were home, continue sending them money. Unless they are at a D1 school*, where money is slipped to them (athletes) here and there, your child is gonna need money for his/ her basic needs. Yet, be smart about it. There’s nothing more regretful than paying for your child to party their way out of school. Now some kids will get little jobs while taking classes. That’s a great thing.You may still have to help with upkeep of the car and other misc things.
  4. Accept help with a crystal ball.- giWhen my son first started playing basketball, everyone wanted to “help.” Then when he felt like being a goof ball and messing up, they fled. Nothing hurts more than that, for him or myself. From that experience, I’ve learned to evaluate everyone on a individual basis. I know that everyone that smiles in our face isn’t always the best one to trust with your child. It’s true,Not everyone wants something. Finding sincerely good people can be hard at times. But when you do find someone to look out for your son – you keep them. And you make sure they know that they are appreciated. I sleep so good at night knowing that almost every game my son has ever went to, there were warm hugs and familiar smiles waiting for him in that city. Even on campus, he has a circle of people that love him for who he his. That’s a blessing!                                                             https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KiGoh1BUJk4

This post was sponsored by Charlotte’s Youth Broadcasting Camp

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It’s the only full service broadcasting summer workshop for teens.

Get more details here! (If you like it, go on and register. Discounts are available now!)

Friday Four: Finding Chastity

Ok, yes, I know it may be strange for a teen mom like myself to bring up chastity, but YES…. I am. I mean, think about it. Who better? I think I scared my husband so much that when he found out we were having daughters, the first thing came out of his mouth was”I want to get my girls to wear chastity belts!” True story.    It was the first time I have ever heard about chastity belts, but as time past, it was shout out time after time at very interesting times ranging from self preservation to political statements.

 

Believe it or not, there was an Italian woman forced to ask firefighters to liberate her from a chastity belt because she lost the key to the contraption. The woman, who has not been named due to privacy reasons, reportedly wore the belt of her own volition to stop herself from having sexual relations. Chastity belts were long thought to have been inflicted on medieval wives in order to prevent them from having affairs, but historians now believe that they are the stuff of myth; most references to chastity belts in medieval literature are satirical. Our anonymous Italian friend, it seems, did not get the memo. If only she had guarded the key to her iron panties with the same sort of fervor that she dedicated to protecting her loins. NY TIMES

“I tried to push her away, but she wouldn’t stop until she was finished. When she was, she said, “You better not say shit to no one or else you gonna get a terrible whupping.” R. Kelly via The Black Voices

4 Ways to ENCOURAGE chastity to teens:

  1. Protect what your child is exposed.  Give the talk, but walk the walk. Our children can more easily recognize the distinction between right and wrong when we are consistent models of right behavior in all matters. So know that there are some magazines, t.v. shows. and conversations you may need to keep out their reach.

“I tried to push her away, but she wouldn’t stop until she was finished. When she was, she said, “You better not say shit to no one or else you gonna get a terrible whupping.” R. Kelly via The Black Voices

2. Be mindful of who your child is exposed to. Having the right influence around your children is detrimental. My husband and I never let our children out of our sight until they were old enough to articulate what went on around them and understood that their body was private. Our ideal influence are positive, loving (but not too loving*) respectful and non over sexually seductive -dressed person, media, t.v. programs and music..

When my niece was young, like 12,  she made it very clear that not only did she know her daughter had a boyfriend she also said that she did care.  She though because her daughter minion family partydidn’t go anywhere with the boy, that meant there was no concern for that relationship. Well guess what happened less than 3 years later? Yes, she got pregnant. While I didn’t rub it in her face or reminded  her that girls don’t go from pumps to flops. Sex was bound to happen. I thanked God that I never questioned my rules toward my daughters on having boyfriends at a young age.

3. If you haven’t already, build trust. That leads to many opportunities for discussion  and  influence on the subject. We parents have so much more power than we give our-self credit for.

4.Last but not least. Get your child involved in worthwhile activities, like music, sports, drama, and hobbies that develop talents.

ring

I never share pictures of gifts, but I had to share this one. Kaylah’s Sweet 16 gift arrived. Kudos to my Dad, the first man to place a ring on his granddaughter’s hand, he has definitely set the bar. Love him infinity. He said “who’s her Grandpa”!!

More great tips on teen chastity

eHere – yes, just click that 🙂

Alright ladies, keep it locked down.

Jabela!

Friday Four: Plan B- Alternatives To College

This year, like many other parents, I wonder what college my child will end up at. In my cases, I have three graduating within the next two years. Then a six year gap before the next graduation rush. With such a large number of blessings, it comes a bunch of questions. I know accept that everyone of them will not go to college. That’s okay, but what I won’t accept is not having a plan after graduation.

college

In many other countries, college is free. Not here in the U. S. (Yet)  Beside that  a traditional four-year degree isn’t your only ticket to a good job with a solid salary. Some kids may get lucky an pass the bar without going to college and go on to becoming on successful lawyer, baby sit enough of siblings of cousins to become a certified nanny like my friend, Dominique Rice of Perfect Placement . I even know of a man that makes good money helping other people make money. his business is called Charlotte’s Open Air Market. So it can be done! Here’s a couple of ideas to ease your mind about  ‘College or Bust’ theories:

  1. Start A Business At the end of it all, you’re gonna work hard. why not work for yourself?  With drive, initiative, and a quality product, it may be more attainable than you think to make it on your own. In fact, some of the most successful people of the 20th and 21st centuries were entrepreneurs without a college degree.
  2. Pick Up a Certificate Almost 30 million jobs in the U.S. pay $35,000 or more and don’t require a bachelor’s degree, according to the Georgetown center. But that doesn’t mean your education can stop after high school. Most middle-wage jobs — $35,000 to $75,000 a year — in fields with increasing demand, such as health care, information technology and public services, require some form of post–high school certification.   Mom Coach: Noun/ See QC Supermom. A mature woman that supports other mothers in child related issues. She uses her wit, education, personal experiences, influence and resources to help reach desired goals.

    3. Travel the world. Get a job and save up money to leave the country. Check out a world completely different from our own. Do it for a year. You will meet other foreigners traveling. You will learn what poverty is. You will learn the value of how to stretch a dollar. You will often be in situations where you need to learn how to survive despite the odds being against you. If you’re going to throw up you might as well do it from dysentery than from drinking too much at a frat party.1 You will learn a little bit more about eastern religions compared with the western religions you grew up with.

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  4. SELL YOURSELF Expose yourself to anything and everything positive that you possibly can. When he/she has found passion in that field, encourage her/her to sell his/ her skills. Then SCALE it into sellable items to save wear and tear on yourself.  I.e. dvd, keychains, trainings, etc. Mastering a unique skill builds discipline, lets you socialize with other people of all ages and backgrounds but who have similar passions, and gets you paid! COOLBEANS.COM

Education doesn’t have to be tedious, boring, and repetitive, but it should be a self-discovery process that encompasses not only your intellectual growth, but also your professional and personal development. Your child is NOT worthless. That’s what they want you to think. If you don’t go to college you will NOT “ruin your life”.

I was excited to learn about Berea College: . It’s green, smart and progressive. ….. and FREE! There are others doing it creatively too!

never learned in schoolBest Jobs Without a Degree!

The College Conspiracy

Best Colleges for Non Traditional Students

Watch More videos & PLEASE follow me on Twitter- ( CLICK HERE )

Encourage a Senior This Weekend,

Jabela, QC Supermom