And I DOULA!

I was asked during a recent interview,“How do you handle being a doula when you have young kids?” My answer:I love what I do, I have an supportive family and a wonderful gym membership!” (read more on that here: )  Jabela the doula

I think most moms would do well at it! The truth is, giving birth is strikingly similar to mothering: It’s usually chaotic, sometimes stressful, rarely pretty, never easy. You might feel like you’re failing even when you’re not; sometimes, it will feel impossible. But you’ll press through anyway, because forward is the only option. When you do, your doula will be with you. Not just because she’s been there, but because she loves it and lives it!

For those who do not know what a dolua is I’ll explain. Benefits of a Doula

A doula is “a woman who serves” and is now used to refer to a trained and experienced professional who provides continuous physical, emotional and informational support to the mother before, during and just after birth; or who provides emotional and practical support during the postpartum period.

A Birth Doula  Ashley hired  doula Jabelaa

  • Recognizes birth as a key experience the mother will remember all her life
  • Understands the physiology of birth and the emotional needs of a woman in labor
  • Assists the woman in preparing for and carrying out her plans for birth
  • Stays with the woman throughout the labor
  • Provides emotional support, physical comfort measures and an objective viewpoint, as well as helping the woman get the information she needs to make informed decisions
  • Facilitates communication between the laboring woman, her partner and her clinical care providers
  • Perceives her role as nurturing and protecting the woman’s memory of the birth experience
  • Allows the woman’s partner to participate at his/her comfort level

Research evidence shows that the quality services of a postpartum doula can ease the transition that comes with the addition of a baby to a family, improve parental satisfaction and reduce the risk of mood disorders.

 

A Postpartum Doula

  • Offers education, companionship and nonjudgmental support during the postpartum fourth trimester
  • Assists with newborn care, family adjustment, meal preparation and light household tidying
  • Offers evidence-based information on infant feeding, emotional and physical recovery from birth, infant soothing and coping skills for new parents and makes appropriate referrals when necessary

Postpartum doula

It’s World Doula Week -Mar ch 22-28th

The purpose of World Doula Week (“WDW”) is to empower doulas all over the world to improve the physiological, social, emotional, and psychological health of women, newborns and families in birth and in the postpartum period.

Here’s a little more information onAshley -with Jabela the  Doula

postpartum-recovery

My doula service, The Pink Grasshopper is named after my oldest daughter.  I have great holistic mom /baby supplies over there.

I’m on Twitter too. Follow me over here also. I’ll start a few raffles soon once I get some traffic over there .

Check out my Pinterest Board!It’s LOADED with hard to find birthing information!

Need to increase your milk supply? Buy these awesome lactation treats! Cassie is a teen baker from Charlotte NC and makes all sorts of GMO, Vegan and Organic treats!  – Cassie Sweetz

Now Go Have A baby and call me in the morning,

QC Supermom

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What A New Mom Needs

ashlee

The postpartum period begins after the delivery of the baby and ends when the mother’s body has returned as closely as possible to its pre-pregnant state. This period usually lasts six to eight weeks. Sociologically, she has other needs. See the soft reminders below.

  1. Save me some money. Offer to take my baby pictures. You know those hospital pictures as overpriced. I may have something cute to put my lil one in & I’d rather pay you.
  2. Ask me if I mind recycled gifts, like a stroller, car seat, crib, clothes, diaper bag, etc. I just might need it.
  3. Make us a big salad, a big pan of lasagna with a nice homemade dressing on the side and a gallon of mint tea and clean the kitchen completely afterward. Drop it off, wash your hand if you want to hold the baby, do that and leave shortly afterwards.
  4. Come over about 2 pm in the afternoon in your work clothes to water my plants, feed the dog and dust my house. Hold the baby while I have a hot shower. Let me take a nap, while you fold all of the laundry or do some.  Ashley - Doula
  5. Put a sign on my door saying “Dear Friends and Family, Mom and baby need extra rest right now. Please phone first. All donations of casserole dinners would be most welcome. Thank you for caring about our family.”
  6. Remind me to keep myself up. If you gotta find my black yoga/leggings pants or scarf, high lyrca -cotton cami, please remind me to wear it. If we’re going, remind me to grab  my cover up or
  7. Take my older kids for a really fun-filled afternoon to a park, Imaginon or Monkey Joes and feed them healthy food from Earth Fare.

Ashley Cassie sweetz Never be afraid to ask for help. These are the kindnesses that new families remember and appreciate forever. Things that really make a difference are the services for the body and soul. Most of your friends and family members don’t know what they can do that won’t be an intrusion.

Friday Four: The Elephant in the room is nursing!

The number one weapon we have against bad information and advice is to SQUASH IT LIKE A BUG! By perpetuating myths, we only continue to make things harder for black breastfeeding moms in the future.

When we think about breast-feeding, we imagine an infant at her mother’s breast. But in previous eras, mothers who could afford to do so enlisted other women (poor women, slaves, immigrants) to breast-feed their babies. This was the “natural” order of those cultures. But something went wrong. It seems that somehow we’ve lost our way. Black Breastfeeding Week is not, I repeat, is not a week to have more of the white versus black argument. It’s not a week to get white women to notice black women breastfeeding, or even to get white women to acknowledge the fact that black women do breastfeed. It’s a week for us black women to bring awareness to other black women that, yes, we need to no longer let historical trauma hold us back.  Now about smashing them bugs… here 4 myths that need to be smashed!AshleyW

“There is no money to be made in breastfeeding. The infant formula industry is run by the pharmaceutical companies, and there’s a huge profit motive,”

1. Myth: Moms with small breasts can’t make enough milk.   Truth: Breast size doesn’t matter.  Milk production has nothing to do with breast size.  It’s even possible for women with smaller breasts to have an oversupply of milk! Following your baby’s lead and nursing whenever your baby cues to feed will help to ensure adequate production of milk.

“My baby was allergic to my breastmilk.”

Now, before I outright say this isn’t true, it can be — but the chances of a baby having the only true allergy to human breastmilk or lactose in any form, called galactosemia, affects only 47 babies in the US per year… however, 150 people die annually from a falling coconut hitting them on the head. – The Stir

2.Myth: It’s Normal for Nursing to Hurt. Although it’s common to feel discomfort at first, pain is a sign that your baby isn’t latching onto your breast properly. Instead of focusing only on your nipple, she should be opening wide and pulling your nipple and breast deep into her mouth, using her jaw and tongue to massage milk out of your breast. Keep changing positions until your baby feels safe and secure. With a little time and patience, you’ll both get it right. (10Myths about breastfeeding added here for you to read later!) 3.Myth: Many moms can’t produce enough milk. Truth: The vast majority of mothers can make more than enough milk for their baby (or babies!). It is estimated that only 2-5% (some believe this number is lower, closer to 1-2%) of women are truly unable to produce enough milk for their baby. Our species never would have survived if we weren’t able to provide for our young. Low milk production is usually the result of not enough stimulation of the breast from nursing or pumping.

Whether you will be able to breastfeed after breast-reduction surgery also depends on how the procedure was performed. “If the nipple is left partially attached during the procedure and then reattached once the unwanted breast tissue has been removed, it’s more likely that you’ll be able to breastfeed”-Fit Pregnancy 

4. Modern formulas are almost the same as breastmilk. Not true! The same claim was made in 1900 and before. Modern formulas are only superficially similar to breastmilk. Every correction of a deficiency in formulas is advertised as an advance. Fundamentally formulas are inexact copies based on outdated and incomplete knowledge of what breastmilk is. Formulas contain no antibodies, no living cells, no enzymes, no hormones. They contain much more aluminum, manganese, cadmium and iron than breastmilk. They contain significantly more protein than breastmilk. The proteins and fats are fundamentally different from those in breastmilk. Formulas do not vary from the beginning of the feed to the end of the feed, or from day 1 to day 7 to day 30, or from woman to woman, or from baby to baby. Your breastmilk is made as required to suit your baby. Formulas are made to suit every baby, and thus no baby. Formulas succeed only at making babies grow well, usually, but there is more to breastfeeding than getting the baby to grow quickly.

-Other breastfeeding myths-

Enough on the soapbox, goodnight all! QCSUPERMOM 🙂