Wednesday Wow: Your mom should have told you.

I follow the Mom Rules/Code to be the best mom I can be.  I'm not competing with anyone but myself.

I follow the Mom Rules/Code to be the best mom I can be. I’m not competing with anyone but myself.

Let’s talk about those  MOM Codes?

Is it just me or does it seem like mothers are not getting enough support? In a perfect world every mom has a mentor. Their mentor ensures that they follow the mom codes. What? You never heard of the mom codes?

Basically, it’s a bunch of unwritten rules that all moms, well most moms should follow to help get them through those trying mom child rearing times.  As they surly will come. Here is a few from the book. Feel free to share them and add your own.

Never under estimate the power of doing for others!

Never under estimate the power of doing for others!

-Have your own. Go ahead and be independent.As a parent, I want you be. By legal and ethical means of course.

-Have your own opinions and thoughts. Being a puppet is hard work.

-Never, “Throw the brick and hide your hand.” It could be the difference in a friend laughing with you and you loosing total respect.

-Let the kids go out to play AND resolve problems on their own. Now, with computers and TV, they lack the skills to communicate. They don’t know how to get past hurt feelings without telling the teacher and having her fix it. Parents stay out of it. (this goes for the small ones)Don't always be a consumer

-Always be grateful! People don’t like it when you start to smell yourself.

-Your words have power. Don’t be a fool and cross yourself up.

-Breastfeeding is normal! If you can do it. Don’t give it a second thought. It’s a miracle, liquid gold. Feed your child

-Value your time. If you don’t no one else will.

-Say what you mean and mean what you say.

-Volunteer! There is no other way to show thanks to God for giving you the ability to help others.

-Be able to say you’re sorry and mean it.

(I am on a roll huh?)

-How to handle gossip. Never take off your lip gloss for a toad.

-Learn a marketable craft and know how to get paid doing it. Jobs are NOT promised at birth.

-Dress for the weather. PLEASE!

-If you go to a funeral. Go to see other family and friends knowing that the spirit of the loved one has already left the body. After all, do you really want to remember them like that?

-Don’t bring men in and out of your child’s home like it’s a gym. That’s just tacky.

-Clean up after your self. May it be the social, business or spiritual.

Enjoy your children! Find fun ways to say I love having you as my child.

Enjoy your children! Find fun ways to say I love having you as my child.

-Learn how to prepare a healthy meal (or 5)!

-You can’t receive anything with a closed mind, hand or heart.

-Compassion is not a bad thing, but show too much too soon and people may take advantage of you…To be effective you must get in the habit of not always worrying about what other people are thinking of you. Be firm and clear about what you want then give them the opportunity to have their say.

-You have two ears and one mouth for a reason…

-Instill better manners than ‘please’, ‘thank you’ and ‘excuse me’ 

Look up when people enter the room. Go to the door when someone leaves. Well, that it for now.

You don’t poach another mom’s nanny.   • You don’t flirt with another mom’s husband.   • If you are driving your child and someone else’s child and you only have one booster seat, you give it to the other kid.   • And finally, you don’t give living things to other people’s children as birthday party favors.
You don’t poach another mom’s nanny.
• You don’t flirt with another mom’s husband.
• If you are driving your child and someone else’s child and you only have one booster seat, you give it to the other kid.
• And finally, you don’t give living things to other people’s children as birthday party favors.

 Till the next chapter, QC Supermom

The Golden Rules 101

disciplineI heard someone asked, “Are children bad mannered because of a lack of affection from parents?”  Her friend answered “No, kids are bad mannered because of lack of discipline and most parents that suck will say that they do discipline but the truth is that they waffle back and forth and scold there kids then feel bad about it and butter the kids up.”

I sort of agree with that,

WE HAVE A 2 YEAR OLD THAT ACTS LIKE HE GETS NO HOME TRAINING. HE LOVES TO YELL “NO!” AND DOES IT FROM THE BOTTOM OF HIS BELLY! (HOW EMBARRASSING) Our  NOW 4 YEAR OLD USED TO DO THE SAME. NOW HE’S A WHOLE LOT BETTER.

I do call kids out on their behavior though. In my home, if kids say things like, “I want a soda!” My response is, “I am sure what you meant was, ‘Mrs. Smith, may I have a soda

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Try to focus on how good the manners made someone else feel not just insisting your child parrot back the magic words

please?” They look at me dumbly for a moment and then they stammer out the phrase. And then we stumble through thank you and you are welcome. When I see kids treating wait staff poorly, I do the same thing. I also do it in front of their parents. 99% of the time the parents are embarrassed when I say, “Sam, please remember to say please and thank you to Lakesha. Mr. Perkins and I come here all the time and I don’t want them giving me a bad table because of you.” And please note, I speak up after multiple transgressions. I do not slam a 6 year old who forgets to say please because he is so excited about the movie he just saw. I speak up when a 10 year old acts like a jerk on many occasions and has never reigned themselves in.

Please, thank you and excuse me. 

Most times reminding our fellas to use magic words do work. Like any learned behavior, manners must be introduced as early as possible and reinforced consistently. In our home, if you can talk, you can use manners. We have them use them everywhere, especially at home, with each other, from us, parent on down; after all charity begins at home. Simple enough, but they will get it and learn about generosity, feelings, thankfulness and meaning.

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SENDING OUT GOOD KARMA WILL BENEFIT ALL ASPECTS OF YOUR CHILD’S LIFE. IF YOU CAN’T BE ANYTHING ELSE, BE NICE. IT WILL COME BACK TO THEM IN SO MANY POSITIVE WAYS.

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Here’s  two GREAT links to check out: Just click on it.

Etiquette Emergency for Bad-Mannered Kids

Setting Boundaries With Toddlers

THANK VERY MUCH FOR STOPPING by- QC Supermom

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Friday Four: 5 secrets to teaching kids manners

I’ve got another secret to share: Working on baby’s table manners is a stealthy way to boost learning. Forks, spoons, and cups are tools to help keep baby involved. In the process, your family’s traditions of sharing and connecting at the table will be gobbled up, along with the yummy foods you serve. Studies show that regular family meals teach social lessons about turn-taking, patience, and listening, boost positive feelings about food, and actually build better language skills!

Five Mealtime Tips For Baby:

  1. The earlier the better. Set her bouncy seat nearby, or hold her as you eat. As soon as she can sit in a highchair, give her a regular spot at the table.
  2. Know what’s normal. Some babies quickly master using utensils, others struggle for months. Some can sit for 30 minutes or more – others are done after five. Keep offering utensils and let baby work on his skills at his own pace. Exposure to utensils is more important than accuracy. Encourage progress, but have realistic expectations. This is a marathon, not a sprint!
  3. Set limits. At about 9-10 months, baby will start to challenge mealtime rules. Intentionally throwing food and other disruptive or defiant behavior at the table means her mealtime is over. Don’t scold – just take her down and say that she’s done. Try again at the next regularly scheduled snack or mealtime.
  4. Build body cues. Offer small portions, and DON’T make your child “clean his plate.” Help baby learn when he’s hungry and when he’s full by watching him, and commenting on what you see. “Wow, you ate a lot, and now you’ve stopped. I think your tummy is full.” This helps baby learn how his own body works.
  5. Try different tools. Some prefer chubby spoons, others love toddler forks. Explore your child’s preferences to help her make progress. 

Happy eating!- QC SuperMom