How I Got So Many Babies with So Many Contraceptives available?

My Affirmation: Children are the reward of life. ~ African proverb

The short answer is because, it was Gods will. I only planned for two children; a boy and a girl. And I did. My first two were just that. But the great divine had other plans. And it’s a good thing. Because I lost that daughter in 2005. I ended up with nine. Sometimes I attempt figure it out, as if one could truly read Gods mind. I imagine that woman are physical gods. We are so powerful. Some of us have a specific mission to fulfill during our time here on Earth as leaders, nurturers, creators and intentional first teachers.

The old woman looks after the child to grow its teeth and the young one in turn looks after the old woman when she loses her teeth. ~ Akan (Ghana, Ivory Coast) proverb

And then there are women that don’t want any, Team No Kid , Mrs Michal. (the wife of David in the bible, barrenness, etc.)

Professionally, as a birth doula, I really shouldn’t be sharing this list. Since I am a full spectrum doula and trainer, I would be dismissive to omit this information.

13 TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL

Two ants do not fail to pull one grasshopper. ~ Tanzanian proverb
I’ve tried just about every type of birth control on the market. Methods range from non-hormonal and hormonal to single use and long-lasting use. I have noted which ones I have tried. For some, I’ve given my opinion on how it worked for me.

Here’s what you need to know about several of the birth control methods out there to make the best decision for your body and lifestyle:
  1. Permanent Birth Control (This is what finally worked for me)

A surgical procedure that makes a person who can produce sperm unable to cause a pregnancy or a person who can ovulate unable to become pregnant. Permanent birth control is not reversible and prevents pregnancy 99% of the time. While women can choose from bilateral tubal ligation in the hospital (aka “having your tubes tied”) or a tubal block done in a health center, men may choose a vasectomy. Learn more about the pros, cons and side effects of a tubal ligation, tubal block or vasectomy.

2. IUD (Non-hormonal/Hormonal) (Tried it.)

A small t-shaped device that is placed inside of the uterus by a health care provider to prevent pregnancy 99% of the time. Less than 1 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they use an IUD. Available in non-hormonal (copper) and hormonal (plastic) options, the IUD is one of the most effective forms of birth control and can last anywhere between 3 to 10 years depending on which type you choose. Non-hormonal and hormonal IUDs work to prevent sperm from fertilizing an egg. Learn more about the pros, cons and side effects of the IUD

3. Implant (Hormonal) (Tried it.)

A small rod placed under the skin in the upper arm by a health care provider to prevent pregnancy 99% of the time. Less than 1 out of 100 women a year will become pregnant using the implant. The implant, which lasts for 3 years, releases the hormone progestin to stop the ovaries from releasing eggs, and it thickens cervical mucus, so it is difficult for sperm to enter the uterus. Learn more about the pros, cons and side effects of the implant

4. The Shot (Hormonal) (Yup, tried it too!) It was the worst for me. My mood swings were awful

An injection given by a medical professional of the hormone progestin in the arm or hip that lasts three months and prevents pregnancy 99% of the time. Less than 1 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they always use the shot as directed. The shot, also known as Depo-Provera, stops the ovaries from releasing eggs and thickens the cervical mucus, so it is difficult for sperm to enter the uterus. Learn more about the pros, cons and side effects of the shot

5. The Vaginal Ring (Hormonal) (used it for 3 weeks. )

A flexible ring that is inserted into the vagina each month for three weeks at a time that prevents pregnancy 99% of the time. Less than 1 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they always use the ring as directed. The vaginal ring releases hormones that stop the ovaries from releasing eggs and thickens cervical mucus, so it is difficult for sperm to enter the uterus. Learn more about the pros, cons and side effects of the ring

6. Patch (Hormonal) My daughter father LOVED this one. But after I got pregnant, I stopped using it too.

The patch is applied (like a sticker) weekly anywhere on the skin (except for the breasts) and prevents pregnancy 99% of the time. Less than 1 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they always use the patch as directed. The patch releases hormones that stop the ovaries from releasing eggs, and it thickens cervical mucus, so it is difficult for sperm to enter the uterus. Learn more about the pros, cons and side effects of the patch.

7. The Pill (Hormonal) (I consider the pill to be the gateway into birth control. I was on it at 16. I wasn’t consistent. I failed the pill. )

A pill that should be taken at the same time every day for maximum effectiveness, which is often used to reduce cramping and bleeding during periods and that prevents pregnancy 99% of the time. Less than 1 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they take the pill each day as directed. The pill releases hormones (progestin-only or a combination of hormones) to stop the ovaries from releasing eggs and thickens cervical mucus, so it is difficult for sperm to enter the uterus. Learn more about the pros, cons and side effects of the pill.

8. Condoms (Non-hormonal) ( Condoms …..it just isn’t the same. My body would snatch it off. I never considered using the female condom.)

Available in latex or polyurethane, condoms, which prevent pregnancy 98% of the time, are placed over an erect penis to stop sperm from entering the vagina during ejaculation. 2 out of 100 women whose partners use condoms will get pregnant if they always use condoms correctly.

9. Insertive/female condoms are inserted into the vagina and prevent pregnancy 95% of the time. This means that 5 out of 100 women will become pregnant if the inserted condom is always used correctly.

Not only are condoms arguably one of the most affordable, accessible forms of birth control, they also protect against STDs. Learn more about the pros, cons and side effects of condoms and insertive condoms.

10 . Emergency Contraception (Hormonal & Non-hormonal) By the time this one came out, I was done breeding.

Emergency contraception can be used up to five days after unprotected sex. It can come in the form of a pill or copper IUD, which have varying degrees of effectiveness. Emergency contraception prevents pregnancy from occurring by preventing ovulation and thickening cervical mucus, but it does NOT cause an abortion. Learn more about the pros, cons and side effects of emergency contraception.

11. Spermicide (Now, the right one of these, and you’re all set. )

Made with sperm-killing chemicals, spermicides such as foams, suppositories or film (used separately, not in combination) prevent pregnancy 82% of the time. 18 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they always use the spermicide as directed. Placed inside the vagina shortly before sex, spermicides block the cervix and keep sperm from joining with an egg. Learn more about the pros, cons and side effects of spermicides.

12. Fertility Awareness/ Natural Family Planning (Non-hormonal) (Great for a very well organized women. I’m still looking for my spermicide tube I opened last month.)

Natural family planning involves a woman tracking her monthly cycle from her period through ovulation to determine when she is most and least likely to get pregnant. When used correctly, this method prevents pregnancy 76% of the time. 24 out of 100 women who use natural family planning will have a pregnancy if they use the method correctly. Learn more about the pros, cons and side effects of natural family planning.

13. Withdrawal/Pull-out Method (Non-hormonal) (I plead the 5th. Try it if you choose to.)

Withdrawal prevents pregnancy 73% of the time by pulling the penis out of the vagina before ejaculation. 27 out of 100 women whose partners use withdrawal will become pregnant each year, even if used correctly. Remember, there is always a chance of pregnancy if sperm is introduced to the vagina. Learn more about the pros, cons and side effects of the withdrawal method.

14. Abstinence. Just say no thank you. No penis inserted into the vagina. This one works every time.

The fertility awareness method (FAM) is a natural family planning strategy that women can use to help prevent pregnancy. It involves tracking your natural cycle of fertility and your menstrual cycle, developing a better awareness of your body, and using a variety of non-pharmaceutical methods to detect ovulation.

Bonus:

Sterility Promoters – It is suggested that the following are considered by some people to promote sterility:

  • Stoneseed root was used by women in the Dakota tribe. The root was steeped in cold water for hours and then ingested daily for six months at a time.
  • Jack-in-the-pulpit root, though not as potent, was similarly taken by women in the Hopi tribe after being mixed with cold water.
  • Thistles supposedly promote temporary sterility. They were boiled in water to create tea and consumed by women in the Quinault tribe.

Implantation Preventers – It is suggested that the following are considered by some people to prevent implantation:

  • Queen Anne’s lace is also known as wild carrot seed is used as birth control, and traces its roots back to India. The seeds are taken for seven days after unprotected intercourse during the fertile period to help prevent fertilized eggs from implanting in the uterus.
  • Smartweed leaves grow all over the world and supposedly contain substances that prevent implantation, such as rutin, quercetin, and gallic acid.
  • Rutin can also be purchased on its own for a similar purpose. It may be taken after unprotected sex until the start of menstruation.

Menstruation Starters – It is suggested that he following herbs are considered by some people to promote menstruation:

  • Ginger root is considered to be the most powerful herb you can take to promote menstruation. It’s taken via power mixed into boiling water several times a day for around five days.
  • Vitamin C may have a similar effect, but it needs to be taken in higher doses. Taking high doses of vitamin C in synthetic form may make your bowels loose.

Of all these herbs, Queen Anne’s Lace is one of the more broadly discussed birth control options on this list. Its influence spans back to antiquity. Even today, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago share that some women in rural North Carolina are known to consume the seeds mixed into water to prevent pregnancy. Apparently, chewing the seeds produces the most effective results.

NOTE: Bonus content provided via third party links.

DISCLOSURE: Do NOT Use Hand sanitizer on your woman parts (vagina! ) True it’s an insecticide. Many types of chemicals can kill sperm. Hand sanitizer contains ingredients such as isopropyl alcohol, glycerin, and other harsh compounds. In a similar way that hand sanitizer kills germs, it kills sperm as well. Hand sanitizer may reduce the movement of the sperm cells or kill them on contact.

If you have a vagina, you should never use common household chemicals in or around your vagina. The vulva and vagina are very sensitive areas and harsh chemicals may cause burning and irritation.

If you have a penis, the skin of your penis is also sensitive and just as easily damaged. Never use household chemicals, such as hand sanitizer, as a topical alternative to conventional spermicide.

Oooh, neem is good too. I think I’ll do another post on more natural birth control next week. Ya’ll come back now you here!

Happy Kwanzaa!