Wednesday Wow: Sister SoulJah in the QC

Happy Black History Month people! My month of reflection began last week when Sister SoulJah visited the Beatties Ford Rd. library in Charlotte NC. It was like a dream come true. I now have one less thing to accomplish on my Bucket List!

I believe in divine interventions. I believe that you are where you are, sent elsewhere, drawn toward something or some one beyond your conscious efforts. It’s like the minute you intentional strive to be a certain way, your path opens up! The I decided that I would be the best mom I could be. So I sought support. I know I wanted  to connect with people who have taken various paths in life to become the incredible leaders they are today.  (In this video, it’s another great woman, Cheryl LittleJohn of Gastonnia)

During a recent visit to my local library, I seen a flyer saying Sister Souljah was coming to Charlotte for a book signing of her book The Coldest Winter Ever  (you can buy it on Amazon via the high light link)

This was perfect because I had just received her first book from my daughters. They found it in a bin at a local book store for free!

It’s called, No DISRESPECT.  It took me 3 weeks to read it. Not that it’s a hard read or anything, it’s just that I wanted to break it up in sections to use as a conversation piece while taking my girls to school across town in the mornings. It proved to be an asset. Our conversations were deeper. They opened up about the peers and day environment more easily. It’s because she is so relative, approachable, and in sync, I know her books will always  have a place within my family’s book shelf.

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It was a honor to be in her presence with my teen daughters.  Sometimes when we tell our children things, they don’t always “get it!” Even if you experience it and crying your eyes out to warn them. But when it comes from another person. that speaks to them on their level. Spitting out a”  MF*”  here and there….. they tend to get it!

Here’s my short handed-cliff notes. I wrote them on the back of the paper I had signed for two mama friends. I wrote what she said. Do not let your child read it before you.

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It’s been a long time. I haven’t wasted even a second. Been writing, editing, learning, teaching, and traveling the globe. This year, from 11/11 onward, is for the readers and book buyers. We will meet face to face. Share thoughts and converse meaningfully, and become better than we were before, each and all of us, InshaAllah.

If you want to sing your book and listen to her in person, meet her at her next book signing: click below!

http://www.sistersouljah.com/tour/

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Friday Four: 5 secrets to teaching kids manners

I’ve got another secret to share: Working on baby’s table manners is a stealthy way to boost learning. Forks, spoons, and cups are tools to help keep baby involved. In the process, your family’s traditions of sharing and connecting at the table will be gobbled up, along with the yummy foods you serve. Studies show that regular family meals teach social lessons about turn-taking, patience, and listening, boost positive feelings about food, and actually build better language skills!

Five Mealtime Tips For Baby:

  1. The earlier the better. Set her bouncy seat nearby, or hold her as you eat. As soon as she can sit in a highchair, give her a regular spot at the table.
  2. Know what’s normal. Some babies quickly master using utensils, others struggle for months. Some can sit for 30 minutes or more – others are done after five. Keep offering utensils and let baby work on his skills at his own pace. Exposure to utensils is more important than accuracy. Encourage progress, but have realistic expectations. This is a marathon, not a sprint!
  3. Set limits. At about 9-10 months, baby will start to challenge mealtime rules. Intentionally throwing food and other disruptive or defiant behavior at the table means her mealtime is over. Don’t scold – just take her down and say that she’s done. Try again at the next regularly scheduled snack or mealtime.
  4. Build body cues. Offer small portions, and DON’T make your child “clean his plate.” Help baby learn when he’s hungry and when he’s full by watching him, and commenting on what you see. “Wow, you ate a lot, and now you’ve stopped. I think your tummy is full.” This helps baby learn how his own body works.
  5. Try different tools. Some prefer chubby spoons, others love toddler forks. Explore your child’s preferences to help her make progress. 

Happy eating!- QC SuperMom