Wednesday Wow: Getting past postpartum depression (prt2)

On last week, I share 1/3 of of my series on postpartum depression. I hope you liked it. Here’s part 2. Feel free to share and add your business information if you supply servicesw for this illness.

  1. 30 minutes of sunlight per day.

    I have met too many moms beating themselves up with guilt and shame because postpartum depression has a grasp on their JOY. I feel it weighing on my heart to share this message and take a stand. I want moms to know they’re not alone in this struggle. Let’s shake the shame, lose the guilt and help these moms take back their JOY♥   Please LIKE and SHARE if you or someone you know is or has been affected by postpartum depression. visit www.postpartumprogress.com for answers and support from experts and fellow moms.

    I have met too many moms beating themselves up with guilt and shame because postpartum depression has a grasp on their JOY. I feel it weighing on my heart to share this message and take a stand. I want moms to know they’re not alone in this struggle. Let’s shake the shame, lose the guilt and help these moms take back their JOY♥
    Please LIKE and SHARE if you or someone you know is or has been affected by postpartum depression. visit http://www.postpartumprogress.com for answers and support from experts and fellow moms.

  2. Take time with your appearance, grooming, self care. Looking good and caring for your body can help you feel better.
  3. Nurture yourself. What feeds your soul or makes you feel wonderful? Do these things, go to these places.
  4. Keep to a routine. It can be a daily routine or a weekly routine. Even seasonal “routines,” activities or rituals done at particular times around the year, strengthen our sense of rhythmicity and resilience.
  5. Laugh regularly and hard. Visit with people who make you laugh, read your favorite humorous web sites, or watch a TV show that always provides a chuckle. When turning to youtube or the internet, set a timer, and after 30 minutes move on to activities in which you connect with someone you can physically interact with and touch. The internet is wonderful, but during times of depression it can actually serve to further isolate us by creating connection experiences that don’t involve all of the senses through which true attachment is built.
  6. Pray or meditate. Spiritual transformation and growth are a common part of the transition to parenthood. So much about your life has changed. This impacts your control in the world, as well as meaning, purpose, and identity. Exploring spiritual significance is a healthy means of integrating motherhood or fatherhood into who you are.
  7. Sing. Songs can express any emotion and may be used either to release emotions you are feeling or to create in you emotions you are reaching for.dot
  8. Listen to a variety of music.
  9. Spend time with other adults. Talk with supportive and understanding people. Perspective, normalization, and community are essential for the new parent.
  10. Keep a journal. Express your thoughts and feelings by writing them out.
  11. Get involved in the outside world. Help others. There are volunteer programs that welcome parent-baby pairs. Call your local nursing home and ask about opportunities for visitation with healthy residents.
  12. Find a support group. Local birth doulas, midwives, and childbirth educators should be able to help you find a postpartum depression support group in your area.
  13. Use essential oils for depression. To a warm bath or to 2 ½ T massage oil (such as grapeseed oil or almond oil) add 2 drops neroli, 2 drops petitgrain, and 2 drops orange oil. Enjoy a massage or soak for 10-15 minutes. These three oils come from three parts of the orange tree: the flowers, leaves and twigs, and the fruit. The wholeness of them when used together restores balance. Bergamot, jasmine, neroli or clary sage are also recommended for postpartum blues.**
  14. Use essential oils for fatigue. To encourage deep rest – 3 drops of lavender, marjoram, or roman chamomile in a warm bath before rest. To create a sense of more energy: 2-3 drops of geranium or bergamot and 2-3 drops of rosemary to a morning bath or in a bowl of water or a fragrance burner to scent a room: 2-4 drops of any of the following: petitgrain, geranium, mandarin, rose, bergamot, ylang-ylang, lemon, lavender, or rosemary. Especially recommended is a combination of lemon and geranium.** t

** Any time you are adding essential oils to water it is best to first add them to a small amount of milk, and then add the milk to the water. This helps the oils bind to the milk and prevents chemical skin irritation from direct contact with the strong oils.

Wednesday Wow: Getting past Postpartum (prt3)

This is the third part in the series. Let’s look at the help from Integrative Natural Health Practitioners

 

In addition to the natural postpartum depression remedies you can use on your own, integrative natural healthcare provides can provide powerful natural remedies for postpartum depression. The following are a list of some different natural modalities and how they might help with postpartum depression.

  • Massage Therapy: Deeply relaxing. Helps manage physical pain and the impacts of stress.
  • Acupuncture: Deeply relaxing. Helps resolve pain and imbalances such as disturbed thyroid function.
  • Cranial Sacral Therapy: Deeply relaxing. Light touch, fully clothed. Supports the parasympathetic nervous system, thereby stopping an inappropriate stress response, and provides overall support to your body’s innate healing and balancing abilities.
  • Reiki: Deeply relaxing, fully clothed. Helps manage physical discomforts, stress, anxiety, depression, and feelings such as guilt or inadequacy.
  • Yoga: Restores, rejuvenates, and releases bodily held tension. May create community. Many postpartum yoga classes welcome babies. In some areas, you can find yoga classes specifically for emotional balance or postpartum depression.
  • Wellness Coaching: Can help you figure out how to make the life style changes that will support your wellbeing.
  • Nutritionist/Herbalist/Naturopathic Doctor/Homeopathic Practitioner: These professionals are able to assess diet, thyroid, estrogen and progesterone levels, and more to make appropriate nutrient recommendations in the form of foods, supplements, or bio-identical hormones. Their training, certification, and licensing varies widely among practitioner and state. An ND, or licensed naturopathic doctor, is a medical doctor who approaches the body as a whole interconnected system, and uses homeopathics, botanical and other other natural and lifestyle medicine. They are not licensed for primary care in every state, but their training is extensive and phenomenal no matter where they practice. If you cannot find an ND, ask carefully about experience with postpartum depression and always discuss all treatments you are pursing with your primary medical care provider as well.

    I have met too many moms beating themselves up with guilt and shame because postpartum depression has a grasp on their JOY. I feel it weighing on my heart to share this message and take a stand. I want moms to know they’re not alone in this struggle. Let’s shake the shame, lose the guilt and help these moms take back their JOY♥   Please LIKE and SHARE if you or someone you know is or has been affected by postpartum depression. visit www.postpartumprogress.com for answers and support from experts and fellow moms.

    I have met too many moms beating themselves up with guilt and shame because postpartum depression has a grasp on their JOY. I feel it weighing on my heart to share this message and take a stand. I want moms to know they’re not alone in this struggle. Let’s shake the shame, lose the guilt and help these moms take back their JOY♥
    Please LIKE and SHARE if you or someone you know is or has been affected by postpartum depression. visit http://www.postpartumprogress.com for answers and support from experts and fellow moms.

When to see your doctor or a mental health professional

  • It’s never too soon! Any time you have health concerns talking with professionals may be a huge help and a comprehensive treatment plan is important.
  • If your symptoms persist beyond two weeks.
  • If your symptoms are worsening.
  • If your symptoms are severe to the point where they impact your ability to take care of yourself or your baby, give rise to thoughts of harming yourself or your baby, or make you feel desperate.
  • To test for physical causes such as thyroid function or changes in blood volume

Tips for getting past postpartum depression

PostPartum despression is real. I have had nine babies and I think with at least 4 of them I wanted out. I got past it. It’s normal. Stop beating yourself up. Here is a list to help. I have made a 3 part series on this. So don’t miss out. Help is available.

I have met too many moms beating themselves up with guilt and shame because postpartum depression has a grasp on their JOY. I feel it weighing on my heart to share this message and take a stand. I want moms to know they’re not alone in this struggle. Let’s shake the shame, lose the guilt and help these moms take back their JOY♥   Please LIKE and SHARE if you or someone you know is or has been affected by postpartum depression. visit www.postpartumprogress.com for answers and support from experts and fellow moms.

I have met too many moms beating themselves up with guilt and shame because postpartum depression has a grasp on their JOY. I feel it weighing on my heart to share this message and take a stand. I want moms to know they’re not alone in this struggle. Let’s shake the shame, lose the guilt and help these moms take back their JOY♥
Please LIKE and SHARE if you or someone you know is or has been affected by postpartum depression. visit http://www.postpartumprogress.com for answers and support from experts and fellow moms.

Natural Remedies for Postpartum Depression

  1. Get extra rest.
    • Practice excellent sleep hygiene. If you have supportive adults in your life, make sure they know what good sleep hygene is and enlist their assistance setting up these patterns for yourself. They can offer you help with baby or household care to create time for you to rest, or you can be accountable to them for putting these practices into place.
    • Find formulas that are not habit forming and they are not contraindicated when taking other medications. And safe for breastfeeding.
    • Do not use over the counter sleep aids or natural supplements such as melatonin or valerian without the guidance of your healthcare provider. These can interfere with your body’s ability to re-regulate your sleep cycles and are not safe with all medications.
  2. Eat well. Nutrients make a huge difference in your body’s ability to regulate hormones and bio-states. During times of stress, change, and healing, your body uses excess nutrients. You need these vital components to balance your hormones and support neuro-transmitters.
    • Eat lots of dark leafy greens, whole grains, and other fruits and vegetables to assure that you are getting an adequate supply of the vitamins and minerals your body needs.
    • Molasses and nutritional yeast are foods that can boost your B vitamins, essential to stress management.
    • Eating one Brazil nut per day will give you a selenium boost which is helpful for fighting depression.
    • Turkey, often know for its sleep-inducing effects at Thanksgiving, provides calming.
    • Protein will help your body restore after depletion.t
  3. Reduce stress. Reducing stress can take two forms: prevention, and release.
    • Do every preventative measure in your control – say no to social or family functions you don’t have the energy for, turn down unnecessary obligations, ask others to pick up responsibilities that you currently carry. There may be a wealth of people in your life who are willing to help if you ask. Brainstorm who these people may be, make specific plans for when and how to ask them for help, and enlist a loved one to help you overcome any hesitations you have in asking for help.
    • Releases stress is a different task. Make a personal top ten list of stress-releasers, post it where you can see it, and put stress release activities into place whenever you feel your stress point rising! Rescue Remedy is a natural remedy that can be taken under the tongue or in water when you experience sudden or pronounced stressful feelings, or before entering a known stress-inducing situation. It is not contraindicated when using other medications or for breastfeeding. imagesCAF0HMIE
  4. Practice deep relaxation exercises. There are many deep relaxation aids that are deeply effective, and having one or two in your home, kept in a visible location, will prompt you to use them. Try to make a daily habit of spending at least 5 minutes intentionally practicing deep relaxation. Ask a loved one to keep you accountable, and to help with baby care to make this possible. Some aids you may purchase are a meditation CD, miracle balls to release held tension, a still-point inducer, or an acupressure mat. If you want to practice deep relaxation without buying anything, try taking long slow breaths from your lower belly while laying on the floor, sitting by a window and staring out to a mid-distance without focus, or taking a long warm, not hot, bath.
  5. Get exercise every day. Aim for at least 90 minutes a week. Research confirms that 5-10 minute bursts are just as effective as longer stretches, as long as the overall exercise time adds up. So pick up your baby and put on some dance tunes or park at the outer edge of the parking lot to get in more walking.

 

Part 2 will be available on next weeks Wednesday Wow Post. There are 3 in this series. I hope it helps someone! If  you are a professional that supplies services to help a mom dealng with such illness, please post your business info below. Thanks!

The Blue SAHM

“Snap Out of It” they say, “Find something to do”, “Can’t you see how lucky you are?  You have a beautiful baby!  You should be grateful.”I’ve even heard, Is that what you went to  college to be? ” and “Go bake a cake.”ooh, and let’s not forget…. “Get a job, a real one if you’re not happy.”

SAHM's Rock!

SAHM’s Rock!

My sweet lord! Why do moms have to go so far to justify their choices and feelings? We all have different circumstances and reasons for choosing to be a stay at home mom. I had no idea which would be best for my kids,but I knew that I had to do what was in the best interest for our family. Motherhood is tough enough, being a sahm is no picnic. At times it may even seem like a competitive sport. Who needs another stick! Don’t let it beat YOU! Here’s my rules for sticking it to the oppressors:

I felt stuck–like I was falling deeper into a hole I’d never be able to escape.

1st Rule – Don’t cause yourself trouble. You can’t turn on a facet and get mad when the sink fill up.

2nd- Even after a thunderstorm, the rain stops and there’s a rainbow. Never see your situation as permanent.

3rd- Make it ok. Find free and affordable tehun did thatcommunity based events, groups that fit you and time for yourself. Ultimately it’s you that’s going to make it ok. Not hubby, grandma, or baby sitter – just you.

4th- Walk away.  It’s ok to do it. Make sure the child is safe and go. (Come back though)

5th- Guard your heart. People say hurtful things with out thinking. detach and dissolve if you must. most times you’ll just need to let them know that you aren’t crazy and to back off.  It will be harder if you are the baby of the family as I am, but they’ll get the picture when you stop responding.

6th- Give it ambition- If you are going to be home with the children, be there! Create incredible children on purpose. Pull your hair in a ponytail and go out. You and the children will love it. If the house isn’t impeccable, who cares? You and the kids can make a game out of cleaning it once you return.

‘I use all my skills and intelligence – negotiation, patience, problem-solving, creativity – to bring up the children’

When you read the lists below, keep in mind postpartum depression and anxiety are sometimes “comorbid.”  This means you can have a bit of both, or all of both.  If you have symptoms on both lists, that’s not out of the ordinary.

Some days do suck! I would  not lie and say different. But there are more good ones than bad! And when I get old, I have 8 helpers to take care of me. :)

Some days do suck! I would not lie and say different. But there are more good ones than bad! And when I get old, I have 8 helpers to take care of me. 🙂

Okay.  Here we go. You may have postpartum depression if you have had a baby within the last 12 months and are experiencing some of these symptoms:

  • You feel overwhelmed.  Not like “hey, this new mom thing is hard.”  More like “I can’t do this and I’m never going to be able to do this.”  You feel like you just can’t handle being a mother.  In fact, you may be wondering whether you should have become a mother in the first place.
  • You don’t feel bonded to your baby.
  • You can’t understand why this is happening.  You are very confused and scared.
  • You feel irritated or angry. You have no patience. Everything annoys you.  You feel resentment toward your baby, or your partner, or your friends who don’t have babies. You feel out-of-control rage.
  • You feel nothing. Emptiness and numbness. You are just going through the motions.
  • You feel sadness to the depths of your soul. You can’t stop crying, even when there’s no real reason to be crying.
  • You feel hopeless, like this situation will never ever get better. You feel weak and defective, like a failure.
  • You can’t bring yourself to eat, or perhaps the only thing that makes you feel better is eating.
  • You can’t concentrate. You can’t focus. You can’t think of the words you want to say. You can’t remember what you were supposed to do. You can’t make a decision. You feel like you’re in a fog.
  • You feel disconnected. You feel strangely apart from everyone for some reason, like there’s an invisible wall between you and the rest of the world.
  • You feel like you should be able to snap out of it, but you can’t.
  • You might be having thoughts of running away and leaving your family behind. Or you’ve thought of driving off the road, or taking too many pills, or finding some other way to end this misery.
  • You know something is wrong. You may not know you have a perinatal mood or anxiety disorder, but you know the way you are feeling is NOT right. You think you’ve “gone crazy”.
  • You are afraid that this is your new reality and that you’ve lost the “old you” forever.
  • You are afraid that if you reach out for help people will judge you. Or that your baby will be taken away.

You may have postpartum anxiety or postpartum OCD if you have had a baby within the last 12 months and are experiencing some of these symptoms:

  • Your thoughts are racing. You can’t quiet your mind. You can’t settle down. You can’t relax.
  • You feel like you have to be doing something at all times. Cleaning bottles. Cleaning baby clothes. Cleaning the house. Doing work. Entertaining the baby. Checking on the baby.
  • You are worried. Really worried.  All. The. Time.  Am I doing this right?  Will my husband come home from his trip?  Will the baby wake up? Is the baby eating enough? Is there something wrong with my baby that I’m missing? No matter what anyone says to reassure you it doesn’t help.
  • You may be having scary thoughts. Ones that you’ve never had before.  They fly into your head unwanted and you know they aren’t right, that this isn’t the real you, but they terrify you and they won’t go away.  These thoughts may start with the words “What if …”
  • You are afraid to be alone with your baby because of scary thoughts or worries.  You are also afraid of things in your house that could potentially cause harm, like kitchen knives or stairs, and you avoid them like the plague.
  • You may feel the need to check things constantly. Did I lock the door?
  • You may be having physical symptoms like stomach cramps or headaches, shakiness or nausea.  You might even have panic attacks.
  • You feel like a captive animal, pacing back and forth in a cage. Restless.  On edge.
  • You’re having trouble sleeping.  You are so, so tired, but you can’t sleep.
  • You are afraid that this is your new reality and that you’ve lost the “old you” forever.
  • You are afraid that if you reach out for help people will judge you.  Or that your baby will be taken away.

And then there’s the sahm that have toddlers (or older) and is simply frustrated. This video is for you.

Now that you’ve gone through these lists are you thinking “How the heck does this lady know me? Is there a hidden camera in here?”  Nope.  What this should tell you is that you are not alone and you are not a freak and you are not highly unusual.  If you are having these feelings and symptoms then it is possible you are experiencing common illnesses that 15 to 20% of new mothers have, and they are completely normal..

Come hang out with me and Queen City Stay At Home Moms. We’re here to support you!

 One mom chose prozac: She she shared: My doctor listened to me carefully, asked some pointed questions about my sleeping, eating, and moods before pointing out the obvious: depression doesn’t always look like my narrow imagination assumed. It isn’t always being unable to get out of bed; it can be getting out of bed muttering obscenities before the day has even begun. It can be clenched teeth and yelling too quickly and tearful apologies. My depression rendered me a very unhappy SAHM. My doctor said: “When other coping strategies aren’t working, it’s time to call in the big guns. Your family deserves it. You deserve it.” Jenna Marshal from Babble

 

Frequently Asked Questions About Postpartum Depression & Related Illnesses

Signs of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders

 I’ll stick with my green tea and Queen City Stay At Home Moms as I enthusiastically applaud ANY woman who knows what she wants, knows what will make her happy/be the best mom she can be, and goes for it. Let’s get on a new wave of feminism and be happy for everyone’s individual choice.

 

Enjoy motherhood now,

QC Supermom